%Q, %q, %W, %w, %x, %r, %s

I stumbled across this and found it rather informative. Obviously I knew of some of these, such as %Q, but certainly never knew of the differences between them all. And the fact that you can use any non alphanumeric chars for the parenthesis is ‘pleasurable’ ^_^

Simple Ruby on Rails

%Q | %q | %W | %w | %x | %r | %s

%Q

This is an alternative for double-quoted strings, when you have more quote characters in a string.Instead of putting backslashes in front of them, you can easily write:
>> %Q(Joe said: "Frank said: "#{what_frank_said}"")
=> "Joe said: "Frank said: "Hello!"""

The parenthesis “()” can be replaced with any other non-alphanumeric characters and non-printing characters (pairs), so the following commands are equivalent:
>> %Q!Joe said: "Frank said: "#{what_frank_said}""!
>> %Q[Joe said: "Frank said: "#{what_frank_said}""]
>> %Q+Joe said: "Frank said: "#{what_frank_said}""+

You can use also:
>> %/Joe said: "Frank said: "#{what_frank_said}""/
=> "Joe said: "Frank said: "Hello!"""

%q

Used for single-quoted strings.The syntax is similar to %Q, but single-quoted strings are not subject to expression substitution or escape sequences.
>> %q(Joe said: 'Frank said: '#{what_frank_said} ' ')
=> "Joe said: 'Frank said: '#{what_frank_said} '…

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